Mechanism of Disease

The chronic, persistent nature of atopic dermatitis means it’s always there, even when patients may appear asymptomatic1


  • AD is a chronic, heterogeneous, inflammatory skin disease2
  • AD is a result of immune dysregulation and skin barrier dysfunction3,4
  • Several Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13, play a central role in the underlying inflammatory process5-8
  • Th22 and Th1 cytokines also play an active role3,5

 

Illustration of initiation of acute atopic dermatitis (AD) and progression to chronic skin lesions5

Reprinted from Gittler JK, Shemer A, Suárez-Fariñas M, et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012;130(6):1344-1354. Copyright 2012, with permission from American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

References:

  1. Suárez-Fariñas M, Tintle S, Shemer A, et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011;127(4):954-964.
  2. Weidinger S, Novak N. Lancet. 2016;387(10023):1109-1122.
  3. Guttman-Yassky E, Waldman A, Ahluwalia J, et al. Semin Cutan Med Surg. 2017;36(3):100-103.
  4. Boguniewicz M, Leung DYM. Immunol Rev. 2011;242(1):233-246.
  5. Gittler JK, Shemer A, Suárez-Fariñas M, et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012;130(6):1344-1354.
  6. Tazawa T, Sugiura H, Sugiura Y, et al. Arch Dermatol Res. 2004;295(11):459-464.
  7. Suárez-Fariñas M, Dhingra N, Gittler J, et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2013;132(2):361-370. 2002;119(4):870-875.
  8. Koppes SA, Brans R, Ljubojevic Hadzavdic S, et al. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2016;170(3):187-193.